Marketing Psychology

Can Too Much “Science” be Bad for Your Brand?

The weight of scientific authority has long been a persuasive tool in marketing strategies. As an extremely social species, humans care a great deal about categorical authority, and in the modern world there are few more revered sources of authority than those affiliated with the theoretical concept of science.

Avoiding the Uncanny Valley

When it comes to “humanness,” it turns out there is a fine line between appealing and appalling. Although rather than a line, research suggests the border separating the two feelings may be more of a valley.

The Power of Listening

We all have our preferred way of gathering information from the world. Some of us read, many of us watch television or interact with social media, and some of us even prefer to take in our information via the structure of online or in-person meetings (remember those?).

Windows to the Soul?

A recent study published in the Personality and Social Psychology Bulletin has uncovered a surprising result of what happens when attention is directed towards another person’s eyes.

The Importance of Gratitude

We have all been taught the importance of saying please and thank you, but did you know that a sincere expression of gratitude may also help your bottom line?

The Looking-Glass Effect

The term “Looking-Glass Self” was introduced by Charles H. Cooley in 1902 to describe how our self-identity is impacted by the people around us.1 According to the theory, how we see ourselves is deeply intertwined with our perception of how we think other people view us and our behaviors.

Experiencing Information

From a neurological perspective, the memory of an event personally experienced in real-time, such as a game, concert, or award show, is “formatted” differently than one’s general knowledge of the event itself.

You’ve Changed…Or Is It Just Me?

A recent study published by the Public Library of Science (PLOS One) is probing the question of personality. Specifically, did the COVID-19 crisis alter our unique predispositions toward thinking, feeling, and behaving in certain ways?

Shrinking Attention Span, or a Sophisticated Search for Meaning?

Eye tracking studies have discovered that many ads fail to even attract a consumer’s gaze, much less capture their attention long enough to create a functional connection to the product/brand.

Out of Sight, Never in Mind

In the late 1950s, subliminal messaging became a mainstream sensation practically overnight when Vance Packard claimed that imperceptibly flashing the words “eat popcorn” or “drink Coca-Cola” across movie theater screens resulted in an 18-50% sales increase of those items.